The five housing stats that really matter

drop Google Analytics Here end analytics BEGIN Krux Control Tag for "realestate.com.au Header" END Krux Controltag Manual Twitter OG Crazy Egg StartFragment Residential property is possibly one of the best tracked markets, but when it comes to data it can be difficult to know what to look for and what really matters. Here are the top five statistics to track when you are looking to understand where the market is headed. 1. Median prices Watching median house prices change is currently the best way to see how the market is performing and it is possible to look at this data daily with CoreLogic RP Data providing an index for five capital cities. Once you have narrowed down the suburb you

Morning Briefing: RBA says housing concerns are easing

Morning Briefing: RBA says housing concerns are easing StartFragmentAustralia’s central bank said inflation would remain low and the economy could grow faster, while house-price concerns had cooled, in explaining its decision to cut interest rates for the second time in four months. “While prospects for growth were positive, there was room for stronger growth, which could be assisted by lower interest rates,” the Reserve Bank of Australia said in minutes of its Aug. 2 meeting, when the benchmark was reduced to a fresh record low of 1.5%. “The risks associated with rising household sector leverage and rapid gains in housing prices had diminished.” RBA Governor Glenn Stevens and his board

Morning Briefing: Survey reveals property turn-offs for Australians

StartFragmentSurvey reveals major property turn-offs for Australians High crime rates are the major turn off for Australians when it comes to making a property purchase according to the results of a new survey. Carried out by Finder.com.au, the survey of more than 2,000 Australians found that 75% of people would not by a home in an area that had higher than average crime rate. Being close to noisy pub would also stop 68% of people from buying a home in a particular area, while 64% said they would not buy in an industrial suburb. In comparison, only 36% of Australians would be put off buying in a neighbourhood where public housing is present, while both being within two kilometres of

9 ways to learn a new neighbourhood

Moving house can be a very disorienting experience, one that’s often made worse if you’re moving miles away from your familiar suburb where your local barista knows your daily order and your dog has a favourite digging spot at the park down the road. The only way to overcome this is to throw yourself in head first and make the effort to fall in love with your new suburb. The aim is to feel truly at home in your new digs and the best place to start is with the surrounding streets. Here’s some ways to uncover an urban hood and shake that newbie feeling. Hit the footpath There’s no better way to check out your new suburb than to strap on your walking shoes and pound the pavement. Don’t play it

9 things that turn buyers off

While every buyer is their own man or woman, there are some common complaints from buyers looking for properties that don’t pass muster. Know what they are and you can avoid them when it’s your turn to sell. Clingy sellers It can be extremely difficult to let go of a property, especially if it’s somewhere you’ve made a home and stitched together memories. But once you’ve decided to sell you need to commit to that process. Give your agent room to do their job, and potential buyers the space they need to get hooked. Sellers that linger during an open inspection, or start regaling inspectees with merry tales of every last crevice will turn most people off. Even if your stories are actually quit

10 Essential Questions to Ask When Buying a Home (That You May Have Missed)

You’ve finally found it: a home you’re swooning over and dying to own. From the exposed ceiling beams to the hardwood floors, this feels like the place. So what’s next? Don’t just stand there dumbstruck; it’s time to dig deeper and ask questions—and not just the kind that randomly pop into your head, either. You need to hit all of the necessary topics head-on, and some of them are not so obvious. But you’re in luck: We’ve pulled together a checklist of some of the most important initial questions to ask when buying a home: What is the home’s sales history? When was the last time the house sold, and how much did the current owners pay for it? This is essential intel, and you don’t even have t

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